Kentucky (KY) Buyers Agent

Buyers Agent - Real Estate Professionals listed by town.

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You want the best - the best doctor, the best lawyer, the best dentist. You seek recommendations from family, friends, and co-workers - the people you trust. It stands to reason that you would seek the best Buyers Agents agent to assist you with your largest financial transaction. 

In an effort to insure that only the best Buyers Agents are granted links, we require the following:

  • Full time Realtor®.

  • Minimum of five years experience.

  • Holders of advanced, industry recognized designations.

  • Informative web site.

  • Daily response to emails.

The purpose of this site is to provide you with a link to a top Buyers Agent in the town of your choice. When a Buyers Agent requests a link on this site we utilize industry publications to verify their experience and qualifications. If the Buyers Agent meets our requirements, a link is provided. We screen - you decide. Your name and contact information is not required. You will not be contacted by anyone without your permission. 

To find a Buyers Agent in the town where you are locating, click on the first letter of that town. A new window will open. To return to this site, close the open windows.  

 

General Facts

For Kentucky

Kentucky Buyers Agents - homes for sale
 
Median Household Income: $ 32,540
Income (w/ Children): $ 47,331
Population: 3,936,499
Land Area: 39,732 Square Miles
Population Density: 99 Persons per Square Mile
Nickname: Bluegrass State
Capital: Frankfort
Date of Statehood: June 1, 1792
State Bird: Cardinal
State Flower: Goldenrod
State Tree: Kentucky Coffee Tree
 

Kentucky is located in the east central United States, bordering the Ohio River. Kentucky is one of four states that bear the name commonwealth, and its full title is the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Frankfort is the capital of Kentucky. Louisville is the largest city and center of the state’s largest metropolitan area.

Kentucky has had a rich and varied history since frontier times, when it was the haunt of Daniel Boone and other famous pioneers. Kentucky entered the Union on June 1, 1792, as the 15th state. Located on the border between the historical U.S. regions of the North and the South, the state officially remained in the Union during the American Civil War (1861-1865). But the state was a contested area, and a considerable number of its citizens fought with the Confederate army. Significantly, the key Civil War political figures of the Union and the Confederacy, Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis, were both born in Kentucky. Kentucky slowly recovered from the war, and in the remaining decades of the 19th century, its people began to develop the manufacturing sector of the state’s economy that remains its cornerstone today.

The name of the state is derived from a Cherokee name for the area south of the Ohio River. The early pioneers spelled the name in many ways, including "Kaintuckee" and "Cantuckey." Its meaning is disputed, but some historians believe it means "meadowland." The state’s official nickname is the Bluegrass State, which is derived from the famed bluegrass grown in pastures in central Kentucky. The grass, while green itself, has buds with a purplish-blue hue, which give pastures a bluish tint when seen from a distance. The nickname also recognizes the role that the Bluegrass region has played in Kentucky’s economy and history.

Kentucky is the 37th largest state in the Union, with an area of 40,411 square miles, including 679 square miles of inland water. The state has a maximum extent, from east to west, of 422 miles and a maximum dimension north to south of 182 miles. Because the state’s borders are in part formed by three rivers which often adjust their course, the state’s boundaries are somewhat indeterminate. The approximate mean elevation is 750 feet.

The climate of Kentucky is characterized by warm or hot summers and cool winters. Throughout the year, temperatures do not vary greatly from place to place, although they are generally slightly lower in the Appalachian Plateaus region than elsewhere in the state. Average July temperatures are usually from 76° to 80° in the central and western areas and from 74° to 76° in the east. January averages range from below 34° in the northern Bluegrass region to more than 38° in parts of the south. Temperatures below freezing are common throughout the state during winter, although extended periods of very cold weather do not occur every year.

Precipitation is, for the most part, dependable and well distributed throughout the year. Precipitation ranges from less than 42 inches in the northern Bluegrass region to more than 50 inches in the extreme south.

The growing season, or period from the last killing frost in spring to the first killing frost in fall, varies from less than 180 days in the north and in the farming areas of the Appalachian Plateaus region to more than 210 days in the Mississippi River valley.

The climate of Kentucky is characterized by warm or hot summers and cool winters. Throughout the year, temperatures do not vary greatly from place to place, although they are generally slightly lower in the Appalachian Plateaus region than elsewhere in the state. Average July temperatures are usually from 76° to 80° in the central and western areas and from 74° to 76° in the east. January averages range from below 34° in the northern Bluegrass region to more than 38° in parts of the south. Temperatures below freezing are common throughout the state during winter, although extended periods of very cold weather do not occur every year.

Precipitation is, for the most part, dependable and well distributed throughout the year. Precipitation ranges from less than 42 inches in the northern Bluegrass region to more than 50 inches in the extreme south.

The growing season, or period from the last killing frost in spring to the first killing frost in fall, varies from less than 180 days in the north and in the farming areas of the Appalachian Plateaus region to more than 210 days in the Mississippi River valley.